GEOG 3290

Mountain Geography
Credit Hours:
3

Mountain Geography is an intermediate undergraduate course on the field of Montology, the Science of Mountain Studies, which serves UGA students in both increasing their knowledge on mountain landscapes and their understanding of associated human societies and ecosystems, by providing a review of foundations of the different geographies of mountains worldwide, their current comparative conservation status, and their research prospects on mountain community development in the global environment.

Semester Offered:
Spring
Level:

FYOS 1010

Sacred Geographies
Credit Hours:
1

This course seeks to engage students in geographical literacy of one of the most important dimensions to understand the 'essence of place' as the spiritual or sacred realm. This Odyssey seminar will train in broader ways to understand conservation efforts in the plexus of body, mind and spirit, fused to the need of developing identity markers of ethnoecological importance for indigenous revival. Furthermore, it will train to evaluate the 'essence of self' by analyzing how mythologies of the sublime articulate identity markers, such as in the indigenous people, who still relate to the sacred as metageographical realm.

Semester Offered:
Spring
Level:

GEOG 1125E

Resources, Environment and Society
Credit Hours:
3

This is an introductory environmental geography course offered on-line. The course is structured in sequential 8 modules that will be covered in weekly basis. Each module has four chapters. Each chapter will be covered with readings from the textbook, watching videos, listening to podcasts and reviewing class notes summaries. Quizzes after each chapter via de LaunchPad will be available for summative assessments. Grading will take place each Sunday evening. Formative assessments at the end of each module will enable you to access the next module in the series. All assignments should be submitted to the Assignment Dropbox. All Discussions should be logged in the weekly thread. The due date for each week is Sunday 8:00pm EST, as UGA is located in Athens, near Atlanta, Georgia, at the heart of it all...

Semester Offered:
Summer
Level:

GEOG 2250H

Environmental Geography for Honors
Credit Hours:
3

This introductory geography course aims to engage honor students in environmental literacy, developing their understanding of the complexities of Earth systems, particularly related to the role of humans and the interactions that sustain societies and to determine societal trends on natural resources management. This course will utilize critical thinking to aid in understanding environmental governance complexities of sustainability and climate change by innovative pedagogies, such as the Reacting To The Past (RTTP) game and the Writing Intensive Program (WIP) within hybrid approaches of lecture and online instruction.

Semester Offered:
Fall
Level:

GEOG/LACSI 4720/6720

Political Geographies of Latin America and the Caribbean
Credit Hours:
3

This course engages students in the political geographical literacy of Latin America and the Caribbean, developing their understanding of environmental complexities of regional systems, particularly related to the role of history and socioeconomics on the interactions of the political landscape that have modified culture-sustaining countries’ institutional governance that determined unique developmental trends. Different teaching techniques for regional geographies will be stressed with the use of aide memoire, such as exploration bits, language and cultural insights. This course will explore didactic principles in today’s Latin American democracies, analyzing the underlying factors of environmental sustainability and forecasting its likelihood of success. Current debates on development models associated with conservation of bio- and cultural diversity, as well as with economic/ecological imperatives for current global trends, will be held as professional training.

Semester Offered:
Spring
Level:

GEOG 8810

HUMAN-ENVIRONMENT RELATIONS
Credit Hours:
3

This class seeks to scrutinize environmental complexities of nature/society couplings in the management of biodiversity conservation within ecoregional systems, particularly relating the roles of history, politics and socioeconomics on production wilderness areas and other protected cultural landscapes of the present. By analyzing biogeographical theory under lenses of critical social theory and ecocriticism, students will be able to discern the objectives of current major conservation efforts in the agenda of multinational organizations and multilateral science funding agencies to give priority to recent targets of climate change, food security, income inequalities and social sustainability in the new wave of geocriticism.

Semester Offered:
Fall
Level: