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Chapter 11: The role of ground features in the perception of figure-ground and subjective contours.

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Figure 1. Mick Namarari Tjapaltjarri. Untitled, 1998, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 2. Gaiyabidja Lalara. Untitled, 1970s, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 5. See text for comments. Mawalan Marika, The Wagelag Sisters, 1948, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 6. The lines on the ground areas follow the shapes of the figures and their connections. Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri, Dingo Dreaming, 1988, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 7. The brown and orange ground areas have delineations parallel to the edges of the figures. Pinta Pinta Tjapanangka, Tingari dreaming at YaruYaru c 1978, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 8. Deliberately disordered ground makes figures difficult to discern. Mawalan Marika, Tribesmen at sea and land, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 9. Nested occlusions convey a sense of distance such as for the birds on the upper left and lower right. Mawalan Marika, Yalangbara, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 10. Nested occlusions of red "bulls eye" figures combined with a size gradient give rise to a sense of their motion in depth. Shorty Lungkata Tungurrayi, Men travelling in a bush fire 1972-1973, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 11. Marabinyin, Mullet fish totems, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 12. Peter Mondjingu, Emu, c 1970s, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.

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Figure 13. Yirawala, Mosquito dance, 1976, © estate of the artist licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency Ltd.