Science Education Research

For Firefly Research please click here

 

The Science Education Research component in the Stanger-Hall lab is a direct extension of our interest in communication. We are specifically interested in helping introductory biology students make the transition to scientific thinking (critical thinking) and identifying gaps in the sexual health knowledge of college students.

 

Current Lab Members

If you are interested in science education research experience (1 year) or would like to add a science education research chapter to your PhD thesis, please contact me. Several projects areas are available, including:

1. Learning with animated online case studies: insights on cognitive processing by students

2. Quantitative reasoning and graph reading skills

3. Using identified knowledge gaps to develop educational tools for reproductive health

4. Campus climate: what students tell us and where help is needed

 

Past Lab Members

Andrea Morrison. Undergraduate Researcher. Andrea was working on a research project that uses a sexual health knowledge survey to analyze student knowledge in the context of pregnancy prevention.

Hannah Roach. Undergraduate Researcher. Hannah was working on a research project that uses a sexual health knowledge survey to analyze student knowledge in the context of STD prevention.

Erin Morris. Undergraduate Researcher. Erin was working on a research project that uses a sexual health knowledge survey to design educational health interventions for college students.

Sydney Smith. Undergraduate Researcher. Sydney worked on a research project that used a sexual health knowledge survey to assess campus climate.

Lisa Dinh. Undergraduate Researcher. Lisa worked on a research project that used a sexual health knowledge survey to design educational health interventions for college students.

Yoonsun Jang. Graduate Student (Educational Statistics, Al Cohen). Yoonsun was conducting the IRT analyses on student learning with different case study versions (animated versus a series of still images).

Juyeon Lee. Graduate Student (Educational Statistics, Al Cohen). Juyeon was using text analysis to analyze student answers to the embedded case questions in the online case studies.

Tifany Lee. Graduate Student (Dramatic Media). Tifany taught an animation class for undergraduate students with students working on the animation of firefly signaling as one of their project. This was supported by an institutional ICE (Ideas for Creative Exploration) grant. Tifany also collaborated on the design of animations for an NSF funded research project, and extracted the data embedded in online case studies.

Heather Rudolph. Graduate Student (College of Education). Heather collaborated on developing question rubrics and scoring student performance on animated case studies.

Jennifer Burns. Graduate Student (College of Education). Jennifer collaborated on developing question rubrics and scoring student performance on animated case studies. Jennifer is now a PhD student in Chemistry.

Lauren Ivans. Graduate Student (College of Education). Lauren wrote her PhD thesis on the utility of IRT for the assessment of student performance and the evaluation of Introductory Biology exams. Based on these insights she also designed higher-level thinking questions for Introductory Biology exams to increase discrimation of IRT among students performing in the A and B range (Ivans et al. in prep). 

Julianne A. Wenner. Graduate Student (College of Education). Julianne collaborated on a research project on the teaching of Evolution in Introductory Biology college classes (Stanger-Hall and Wenner 2014). Julianne is now an Assistant Professor in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Foundational Studies at Boise State University, Boise, ID.

Rachel Wilson. Graduate Student (College of Education). Rachel collaborated on a research project on the impact of How to Study workshops on student learning in Introductory Biology college classes (Stanger-Hall et al. 2011). Rachel is now Associate Professor in the College of Education, Department of Curriculum & Instruction at Appalachian State University, Boone, NC.

Floyd Shockley. Postdoctoral Researcher (Entomology). Floyd collaborated on a research project on the impact of How to Study workshops on student learning in Introductory Biology college classes (Stanger-Hall et al. 2011). He is now the Acting Collections Manager at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology, Washington, DC.

 

Collaborators

Barbara Crawford, University of Georgia

Steve Oliver, University of Georgia

Jim Moore, University of Georgia

Scott Brown, University of Georgia

Al Cohen, University of Georgia

Julie Luft, University of Georgia

Ji Shen, University of Miami

Craig Wiegert, University of Georgia